Tag Archives: BlackBerry

Supporting Local in a Global Marketplace

While listening to 570 News the other day, one of the hosts of “Your Money Matters” assured the audience that although he likes Apple stock, that he wears a BlackBerry on his hip.

I know that I’m not the only person in Waterloo Region with an iPhone, and there are a number of folks with Android devices as well. After all, Google has a local presence here as well.

The fact remains that there appears to be a blind devotion to supporting Research in Motion’s handheld devices, without a critical comparison to competitors. “BlackBerrys have a physical keyboard” is one quick defense, with the strong implication that a touch screen device is useless for typing. Guess what? This post was typed entirely on my iPhone.

Before someone suggests that I don’t know enough about BlackBerry, let me assure you that I do. During my four and a half years working there, I used the Pearl, Bold, Storm, Torch, and all the variants. I even used a Pearl Flip for awhile. Some were better than others, but when it was time to leave RIM, I didn’t hesitate, and bought an iPhone.

I’m not suggesting that everyone should buy an iPhone, but rather that they should acknowledge that they may not have the best, most competitive device. In fact, they should realize that this blind devotion to RIM, and lack of local criticism may in fact have contributed to the lack of true innovation in the last several years.

While I understand the desire to support local businesses, the lack of critical dialogue in the community makes things seem like a case of the Emperor’s New Clothes. I think we need members of the community to be critical of local businesses which are attempting to compete globally. It leaves the perception of being a market leader, where outside the region, the ship has long since sailed.

This increased isolation from competitive devices has no doubt affected RIM staff as well. How many developers at RIM have had much experience using an iPhone or Android? How many know areas in which one is better than another?

Now I’m sure that their situation is abundantly clear by now. The new CEO does not have rose colored glasses. Other recent departures on the executive hopefully reveal a shift in vision, to address the challenges facing them today.

We in Waterloo Region have benefited from RIM’s past success. Does this require seemingly sycophantic praise for their current devices? While I wish my former coworkers the best of luck in the current transition to BlackBerry 10, I can only hope that their new devices meet the demands of the wider international market, and not just those of Waterloo Region.

We should also remember that as a corporation, RIM’s first duty is to its shareholders. The corporation doesn’t “owe” the community anything, outside any possible contracts with the municipalities. However unlikely it may seem, some high level deal could see RIM walk away from the region, to set up shop elsewhere. Don’t think that could happen? Just ask the folks in Salo, Finland, about ailing Nokia. While I don’t see this happening, RIM has significant investment in the region, it is within the realm of possibilities, especially if RIM enters certain partnerships or is otherwise acquired.

What do you think? Am I missing something here? Is there a reason to praise the current BlackBerrys? Does the Be Bold marketing campaign mean anything to you? Should I cut RIM a little more slack as they negotiate their transition to a new platform, or do you, like me, hope that people stop trying to defend their mobile choices by saying that they are “supporting the local guy”?

RIM: So long, and thanks for all the fish

So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish!

Image by Gossamer1013 via Flickr

So, this is it. My last day of employment at Research in Motion. After nearly five years at the company, I’m leaving a great team.

Handing in my resignation letter was a liberating experience. It’s definitely preferable to the alternative means of termination. I feel for the two thousand employees laid off earlier this year. I’ve been in their position before, and it’s not a fun place to be.

My time at RIM has seen some interesting transitions. When I started, the original BlackBerry Pearl was the latest device, marking the entry into the consumer market, from a pure enterprise position. Most recently, the Playbook has staked a tenuous position in the tablet market.

It’s been a fun ride, but it’s time to switch streams. As many resignation notices on the tech world state: So long, and thanks for all the fish. There were after all, some delicious fish along the way. As Douglas Soltys pointed out in his post yesterday, there are a number of colleagues that I leave behind. It’s been a blast working with them.

Next Monday I’ll start my next chapter of employment, with a quarter of the commute. I look forward to a¬†fun challenge, one in which I’ll be able to directly see the results of my work in the company. That’s part of the challenge in working for a smaller company as well. There is more responsibility, but a greater stake in the rewards.

Here’s to the future.