Tag Archives: review

Product Review: Logitech Ultrathin Keyboard Folio for iPad Air

When I was looking for a new case for the iPad Air, I decided that I wanted a keyboard. While I do use the Apple Wireless keyboard with my iPad, it is more often connected to my Macbook, along with my wireless mouse. Also, Apple’s wireless keyboard isn’t as convenient to use when traveling, or when you’re not sitting at a desk.

There were a number of different options when I was looking, and all were in the same general price range. Some, like the ZAGG keyboards, provide extra features like keyboard illumination. This seems a little frivolous, as in most cases, the keyboard is going to be at least partially illuminated by the screen itself. Secondly, I’m a touch typist, so actually being able to see the keyboard isn’t really all that high on my list of priorities. There does have to be some raised bumps so that I can distinguish between keys to find my place of the home row.

Logitech Ultrathin Keyboard Folio for iPad Air

The Logitech Ultrathin Keyboard Folio for iPad Air

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Star Trek DS9 Reviews: The Nagus

The Nagus was a much harder episode to watch than I remember. Wallace Shawn is as amusing as ever, but the multiple levels of racism in the episode is disturbing. There are obviously redeeming values in the episode, but they have to do mostly with the subplot.

Grand Nagus Quark

Stubbornness and greed make Quark rather lonely

You don’t have to look back far in human history to see other cultures similarly vilified, with statements like “they just don’t share our values”. What a farce. In some ways, the regular Ferengi characters are more human than the other crew members, even if Rom is still woefully underdeveloped.

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Book review: Stealing Home by Hayden Trenholm

It took me a long time to get around to reading this book. It’s been on my to read pile for about a year. As I’ve mentioned recently, I’ve started doing most of my reading electronically. In fact, I actually read an ebook version of this, even though I have a paper copy on my desk.

Stealing Home book coverStealing Home (Kindle, Kobo) is the third book in the Steele Chronicles, published by Bundoran Press. The series started with Defining Diana, and following Steel Whispers, both of which I’ve previously reviewed. Through each of these books, I’ve found that the story becomes tighter, and more focused. While the stories can be read independently, the emotional punch of the third book is diminished if you haven’t read the earlier books.

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Book Review: The Parasol Protectorate series: Soulless, Changeless, Blameless, Heartless, Timeless

Back at the 2009 Worldcon in Montreal, I was scheduled to be on a Steampunk panel with Gail Carriger, who was unfortunately unable to attend the convention. It was still a blast, as I met Ann VanderMeer and Christopher J. Garcia (who is quite possibly insane, but in a very good way).

Recently, I read Gail Carriger’s Parasol Protectorate novels, starting with Soulless. The novels are a mix of Victorian paranormal mystery fashion and romance. There are bustles and décolletage, vampires and werewolves, zeppelins and robotic octopi.

Star Trek: DS9 Reviews: Past Prologue

Where Emissary focused on developing the character of Benjamin Sisko, the second episode spreads things out a bit. In Past Prologue, we get to see a great deal more of Major Kira in this episode, as well as have Dr. Bashir meet the sole remaining Cardassian on the station, Garak, a clothier by trade, as well as a potential spy. The theme of the episode is that of divided loyalties. Who do you place your faith in, who do you really trust?

Garak and Bashir

Garak and Bashir

When I first announced that I was going to be watching and reviewing Deep Space Nine, the reaction was pretty immediate: Garak is a real fan favourite. As I started to watch this episode, I was quick to remember why.

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The Enterprise-D docked at DS9

ST:DS9 Reviews: Emissary

The first episode of any television series is important. For completely new shows, it can determine whether a studio will buy an initial season. While the risks are less for a spinoff of a popular show with a built-in audience, especially a flagship show like Star Trek, there are still important tasks to accomplish. The pilot needs to give clear links to the earlier show, usually including cameo guest appearances from an actor on the earlier series. A pilot episode needs to set the scene and establish setting, and it has to introduce and characterize the major characters.

The Enterprise-D docked at DS9

As the pilot episode for DS9, Emissary establishes a number of major themes and story arcs. We also see the important links to TNG, most importantly The Best of Both Worlds, and Encounter at Farpoint. Perhaps most importantly, Emissary introduces the major characters, allowing the audience to identify with them. While it must introduce the main cast, there is a clear focus on the lead role, in this case, Commander Benjamin Sisko.

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Star Trek Deep Space Nine Reviews

Almost twenty years ago, the first episode of Deep Space Nine aired. For the first time, not one, but two Start Trek series were in first run syndication.  After The Next Generation ended, Voyageur started, and again, two series of Star Trek were in first run syndication at the same time.

Star Trek Deep Space Nine header image

Deep Space Nine was a different show than the others. Most obviously, it took place on a space station, and not a starship. Unlike the other shows, where the location could shift drastically from episode to episode, in Deep Space Nine, the location remained the same, with a rotating cast of visiting characters.

When DS9 first aired, I was a big fan of TNG. While I made an effort to watch the new show, the first season was a little too slow for my liking. By the time things started happening, the serial nature of the show had developed in completely unexpected directions, I had no idea on what was going on.

In essence, I failed to watch DS9 because it was different. I had become accustomed to one-off stories with an alien of the week. I quite reasonably assumed that two or three seasons in, I should be able to pick up any random episode, and pick up exactly where I left off. I can’t even claim that I wasn’t warned. During the first episode, the merits of a linear timeline with real consequences for actions is highlighted as one of humanity’s greatest strengths.

Deep Space Nine space station

One of DS9′s greatest strengths is paradoxically also its greatest weakness: a complex serial storyline. This kept me from watching it faithfully in the first run, but also fascinated me on DVD.

How does the series hold up today? I’ve started to watch the series again, and plan on writing my response to the show. In particular, I’m going to look at the craft of storytelling. How did the writers develop the story arcs, how effective is their characterization, and how do they deal with relevant social issues? How effectively do they integrate previous Star Trek canon? What works, and what doesn’t, from a writing perspective. While I may, from time to time, comment on some of the acting, especially when it comes to characterization, I’m not really going to comment on special effects, other than when required for story purposes. For instance, there’s this big wormhole which appears in space near Bajor. This wormhole is important for the story, but very little about the special effects associated with it matter to the story.

This also isn’t going to be a plot review, although I’m not going to hold back on any plot reveals. The show is nearly twenty years old. The statute of limitations on spoilers is long since over. Consider yourself warned. If you’re really looking for a plot recap, check out Memory Alpha.

This blog series will quite obviously take a long time to complete. Some posts will be longer than others. The first post will review the pilot episode, Emissary. It will likely be one of the longer reviews, as there is much to cover in the introduction.