Tag Archives: robert j sawyer

Book review: Red Planet Blues by Robert J Sawyer

It shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone that I’ve read the latest novel by Robert J. Sawyer. Since Sawyer’s novel Hominids was the One Book, One Community reading selection in Waterloo Region several years ago, I’ve read all his books. Sawyer’s most recent novel, Red Planet Blues
, is the first of his books that I won’t be getting signed. Since I’ve started reading extensively on my eReader (a Kobo Glo), I’ve rarely felt the desire to read one of my paper books.

The book cover for Red Planet Blues

What can I say about Red Planet Blues? If you’ve read any of Sawyer’s work in the past, you know what you’re getting: a science fiction story with strong philosophical content. Moral questions are raised on the essence of consciousness and identity. What you don’t get in this book are dinosaurs, although fossils of another sort play an important role in the story.

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Book cover for Triggers

Book review: Triggers by Robert J Sawyer

I recently finished reading Triggers, the latest novel by Canadian science fiction writer Robert J Sawyer. After the television adaptation of his novel Flashforward, there was an obvious desire to tap into a larger market of potential fans. Many of Sawyer’s earlier novels had elements of suspense, but none could ever truly be called a thriller. They have all been heavy on the philosophical issues, exploring ideas and thoughts on the meaning of humanity.

Book cover for Triggers

Triggers is the combination of this philosophy on the human condition, mixed with high stakes action. Sawyer manages this quite well. While Sawyer’s message is as positive as always, the comparison to Michael Crichton’s techno-thrillers is more relevant than ever.

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Aurora Award Finalists

The finalists for the Prix Aurora Awards has now been announced.

While I’ve only read two of the nominated works for Best English Novel so far, (Under Heaven, by Guy Gavriel Kay, and Watch, by Robert J. Sawyer), I’ve read the previous two novels in the series by Hayden Trenholm (nominated for Stealing Home, previous novels reviewed are Defining Diana and Steel Whispers.), and have attended readings by Sawyer, Trenholm and Marie Bilodeau for their nominated works.

I’m also pleased that Suzanne Church (a writer here in the Waterloo Region),  Matt Moore, and Hayden Trenholm are finalists for Best English Short Story. Sawyer is also a finalist for Best English Poem, as are Carolyn Clink, and Helen Marshall.

Douglas Smith (of whom I’ve mentioned the story Radio Nowhere from the Campus Chills anthology) has a nomination for Best English Related work for his collection of stories (Chimerascope), and John Robert Columbo and Brett Alexander Savory are finalists for the Tesseracts Fourteen anthology.

There’s a good article in the Metro News about an Ottawa based group of writers named the East Block Irregulars which includes Trenholm, Moore and Bilodeau which shows how a great group can challenge writers to excel. All of the members of the group have reason to be proud of these accomplishments.

Matt Moore holding Steel Whispers

A photo of SF writer Matt Moore holding his colleague Hayden Trenholm’s novel Steel Whispers. Both Moore and Trenholm are nominated for Best English Short Story.

Reflections on the Past Year

While the beginning of January may seem to be a more appropriate time of year for reflecting on the past year, performance review time in the office tends to be mid-February. Despite some challenges, I think this year was quite successful, both in the workplace and outside work.

During August, I presented a paper on Paddy Forde’s novella “On Spirit” and Rob Sawyer’s short story “Just Like Old Times” at the Social Science on the Final Frontier academic conference at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario. It was a nice little conference, and it was nice to see Rob Sawyer and Julie E. Czerneda at the conference. This was my second academic paper presented at a conference, and was a lot of fun.

During the year, I didn’t accomplish much fiction writing, something which I’m planning to remedy. Part of my problem in the past year is that I haven’t made the time to write. I’ve proven to myself that I can now write 250-500 words a day for blog posts, in addition to my coursework assignments. I’m going to see if I can add fiction writing to these word counts in the next few weeks. If it doesn’t seem to be working, I may decide to reduce the size or frequency of my blog posts. It’s something that I’ve been struggling with.

I’ve done some nice improvements around the home this past year. I’m particularly happy with my garage, now that it’s been organized. Previously, neither car would fit inside. Now, both can fit inside, as well as my snowblower. Yes, this is a first world problem, and I’m aware that I’m contributing to urban sprawl, etc. It’s a beautiful property, with a very large backyard for spending time with the family, but city transit doesn’t come anywhere near here. The way things stand, I’m just not willing to consider alternative ways to get to work.

Federations: The Shoulders of Giants by Robert J. Sawyer

As I’ve already reviewed one of the other stories in the Federations anthology, I thought I would review “The Shoulders of Giants” written by Canadian science fiction author Robert J. Sawyer.

This story was the lead story in Star Colonies, edited by Martin H. Greenberg and John Helfers, of DAW books, which was published in June 2000. It was a finalist for the Aurora Award, as the Best English-Language Short Story for 2000. It has since been reprinted in Federations (2009), edited by John Joseph Adams. The text for the story is also available on Sawyer’s website, and has also been included in Robert J. Sawyer’s short story collection Iterations, published by Red Deer Press in 2002.

The title of this story is an allusion to the words most famously written by Sir Isaac Newton: “If I have seen a little further it is by standing on the shoulders of Giants” in a letter to Robert Hooke in 1676. The phrase can be attributed even earlier, as in 1159, John of Salisbury attributed this phrase to Bernard, a scholar in Chartes.

When one reads science fiction, it’s often easy to see only the future, without considering the impact of the past. Science fiction actually has more of a claim on tradition, as it pays homage to many great scientific theories and figures.

Sawyer’s story was not quite what I had first expected. There are no physical confrontations. When the people of earth aboard the Pioneer Spirit arrive at their destination in Tau Ceti after 1200 years in cyrogenic transport, they do not find alien beings, but instead other humans. As Sawyer notes, “while the colonists aboard the Pioneer Spirit had slept, some dreaming at an indolent pace, other ships had zipped past them, arriving at Tau Ceti decades, if not centuries, earlier — Long enough ago that they’d already built human cities on Soror.”

The theme that Sawyer presents is both ambitious and modest. The pioneers reached for the stars when they were first within grasp. They reached their objective, only to find their achievements eclipsed by the ones who follow. Sawyer pays homage to the greats authors of science fiction who came before, “Asimov, Clarke, Clement, Herbert, Niven, and all the others upon whose shoulders the SF writers of my generation are fortunate enough to stand.”  More than just paying respects to the past, it’s an acknowledgement of the importance of reaching for the stars. Without those few giants among us, there would be no stepping stones for future generations.

It’s an appropriate story for this anthology, which John Joseph Adams notes in his introduction to the anthology that writers such as Sawyer “are keeping the tradition alive, building on what the generations before have laid out, innovating to keep the sub-genre fresh and vital”.