On Passion in Sales and Customer Disservice

The other day, I willingly walked into a Future Shop. I had a particular need, a new BluRay player that was smaller than my 10 year old DVD player that had been in the basement. It needed to fit on a much smaller shelf, and the old unit was a behemoth. Upgrading to a device that used HDMI would also free up the only component input, so I could connect the Gamecube for the kids.


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The future is friendly. It just isn't particularly helpful.

Another family was looking at the BluRay players, being “helped” by their sales vulture. Apparently, they had just bought a $3000 television, and needed a player as well. I don’t know why, but he directed them to the cheaper Sony model on the shelf. Maybe because he could offer it on a greater discount for them. The confusing thing for me was that he wasn’t talking about any of the features any of these players had. The model he was recommending did not have built in WIFI, requiring an ethernet cable to the television location. When he explained why the Sony was so great, he essentially said

When we have televisions out on the floor, we always choose Sony models, because they’re super reliable. Unless it’s for a Samsung television, when we use the Samsung player.

Excuse me? They’re “super-reliable”? At this price point, it’s commodity hardware. You’re not going to get a more “reliable” model by brand. I was of course standing there, holding a non-Sony device.

Was he trying to shame me into changing brands? Unlikely, as his name wasn’t going to find itself attached to my receipt.

Why didn’t he ask more questions about what they wanted? Maybe he asked the questions while in the television section of the store, but I doubt it. Why didn’t he try to upsell to a model with better features. In his own words

“You already spent $3000 on the television”

So what’s the difference between a $69 and $89 model? $20. If you have a $3000 television, are you really going to quibble on 0.67% of your cost, if it gets you useful features? Maybe some might. But this sales guy didn’t even try to match features (benefit to the customer). The only reason I can come up with is that there’s a higher store margin (or personal bonus) for this particular model.

Retail is a very strange business. It’s been we’ll over a decade since I did my time, and I’m reasonably certain that I had slightly more integrity at the time.

I used to try and see if I could get to the far side of the home theatre section without being accosted by a “sales associate”. In the high end area of the store, they usually want to see if you want to buy something. I asked on where the BluRay players were (the other side of the store? Really?) Once he realized that I wasn’t going to be buying a TV, he lost interest fast.

This isn’t the case for all stores, but I’ve found that employees at Best Buy, Future Shop, and other big box stores are in general, don’t really provide that great of service. They can direct you to where things are in the store, and can answer questions about what’s on sale, but often aren’t very good at answering even basic product knowledge questions. Ask them to compare two products? Good luck getting a useful answer! There are obviously exceptions to this rule, and I’ve likely avoided any chance of discovering those valuable salespeople, mainly due to my disgust with those who don’t try. Show some passion about the products!

The Ethics of Prison Architect: A Case Study

Simulation games have a long history in computing. From SimCity to the Sims, gamers have dragged and dropped trees, houses, streets and street lamps rebuilding their own utopia.

But what about simulations of dystopias? Enter Prison Architect, where you build and manage a prison facility. It’s for profit, of course, because that’s how you get money to expand your prison.
Prison Architect

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Two hard things

Two Hard Things

There are only two hard things in computer science. Cache invalidation, naming things, and off-by-one errors.

I was reminded of this quote recently, as I had a wrapper object which exposed a property with the same name as a property in the contained object, but which is slightly different. It’s actually the value contained in a different property.

Foo.Bar.Magic -> 'abcd12'
Foo.Bar.Xyzzy -> 'abcd123'
Foo.Xyzzy -> 'abcd12'

I’m sure that whoever wrote this had a very good reason for doing so, but I spent far too much time debugging a subtle error.

Star Trek DS9 Reviews: Vortex

Where The Nagus was an episode of the week, Vortex is an episode which advances a number of plots and themes, most importantly, Odo’s origins.

The key with changeling properties
The key to Odo’s past

We start the episode with a standard gimmick: Odo is concealed as an inanimate object to eavesdrop while Quark is some stolen goods. It’s a quick scene, easy to figure out. That’s web things go south, and one of the twinned Miridorn is killed. It seems that Quark had arranged for a robbery of the sale, as there’s greater profit from hiring a thief than in buying the goods direct.
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Why CAPTCHAs are evil

Have you ever signed up for an internet forum or web app? Chances are, you’ve seen a CAPTCHA: a little image with distorted letters demanding that you prove that you are human. Or is that what it is really asking? Perhaps instead, it’s asking that you prove that you’re sighted.


Phoney Security
CAPTCHAs really just provide the illusion of security

CAPTCHAs (Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart), are supposed to prevent automated computer programs from posting spam messages on public forums. It’s a kind of Turing test that assumes that computers cannot pass.

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Star Trek DS9 Reviews: The Nagus

The Nagus was a much harder episode to watch than I remember. Wallace Shawn is as amusing as ever, but the multiple levels of racism in the episode is disturbing. There are obviously redeeming values in the episode, but they have to do mostly with the subplot.

Grand Nagus Quark
Stubbornness and greed make Quark rather lonely

You don’t have to look back far in human history to see other cultures similarly vilified, with statements like “they just don’t share our values”. What a farce. In some ways, the regular Ferengi characters are more human than the other crew members, even if Rom is still woefully underdeveloped.

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