On Passion in Sales and Customer Disservice

The other day, I willingly walked into a Future Shop. I had a particular need, a new BluRay player that was smaller than my 10 year old DVD player that had been in the basement. It needed to fit on a much smaller shelf, and the old unit was a behemoth. Upgrading to a device that used HDMI would also free up the only component input, so I could connect the Gamecube for the kids.


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The future is friendly. It just isn't particularly helpful.

Another family was looking at the BluRay players, being “helped” by their sales vulture. Apparently, they had just bought a $3000 television, and needed a player as well. I don’t know why, but he directed them to the cheaper Sony model on the shelf. Maybe because he could offer it on a greater discount for them. The confusing thing for me was that he wasn’t talking about any of the features any of these players had. The model he was recommending did not have built in WIFI, requiring an ethernet cable to the television location. When he explained why the Sony was so great, he essentially said

When we have televisions out on the floor, we always choose Sony models, because they’re super reliable. Unless it’s for a Samsung television, when we use the Samsung player.

Excuse me? They’re “super-reliable”? At this price point, it’s commodity hardware. You’re not going to get a more “reliable” model by brand. I was of course standing there, holding a non-Sony device.

Was he trying to shame me into changing brands? Unlikely, as his name wasn’t going to find itself attached to my receipt.

Why didn’t he ask more questions about what they wanted? Maybe he asked the questions while in the television section of the store, but I doubt it. Why didn’t he try to upsell to a model with better features. In his own words

“You already spent $3000 on the television”

So what’s the difference between a $69 and $89 model? $20. If you have a $3000 television, are you really going to quibble on 0.67% of your cost, if it gets you useful features? Maybe some might. But this sales guy didn’t even try to match features (benefit to the customer). The only reason I can come up with is that there’s a higher store margin (or personal bonus) for this particular model.

Retail is a very strange business. It’s been we’ll over a decade since I did my time, and I’m reasonably certain that I had slightly more integrity at the time.

I used to try and see if I could get to the far side of the home theatre section without being accosted by a “sales associate”. In the high end area of the store, they usually want to see if you want to buy something. I asked on where the BluRay players were (the other side of the store? Really?) Once he realized that I wasn’t going to be buying a TV, he lost interest fast.

This isn’t the case for all stores, but I’ve found that employees at Best Buy, Future Shop, and other big box stores are in general, don’t really provide that great of service. They can direct you to where things are in the store, and can answer questions about what’s on sale, but often aren’t very good at answering even basic product knowledge questions. Ask them to compare two products? Good luck getting a useful answer! There are obviously exceptions to this rule, and I’ve likely avoided any chance of discovering those valuable salespeople, mainly due to my disgust with those who don’t try. Show some passion about the products!

Author: Nick Matthews

A software developer and English major. Full time geek.

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