First aid

For two days, I’ve watched videos featuring bloodshed, knife attacks, punctured lungs, objects embedded in eyes, and amputations. This wasn’t a slasher film marathon, but first aid training.

I’ve had first aid training many times over the years, probably starting with some training with Scouts Canada. First aid skills were far more likely to be required in scouting than in today’s modern office environment, but as the Scouts motto said: Be Prepared. So once again, I took the first aid, CPR and AED training.

Small hand injury
The real extent of injuries expected in my workplace

The training materials have changed over the years, most clearly showing the change are the instructional videos. The production quality has dramatically improved. They’re quite effective at showing the first aid techniques, and in drilling the basic components of giving first aid, such as assessing vital signs. They’re also obviously not likely to win any acting awards. While the makeup is quite realistic, showing increasingly pale and sweaty skin for those suffering from shock, and perhaps more closeups on the injuries than is entirely comfortable, all the actors remain remarkably calm during all the scenarios.

Which isn’t necessarily a bad thing for instructional videos. The focus is appropriately placed on the treatment of injuries, rather than on the reactions of those involved. This is likely more effective for training purposes, than a more realistic response.

There are also a few amusing moments in the videos, in particular when they show the first upper arm open fracture. The casualty in question is in a stable with a small pony named Killer, as seen on a sign outside the stall. It’s a small touch, appreciated by this audience. Most amusingly, the pony is far shorter than the casualty’s arms. In truth, having some humour in the material seems to be pretty important, especially when dealing with painful subject matter.

There are also a series of skits involving a construction site. In the last video involving the construction site, the workers create their own triangular bandage to form an arm sling out of other materials. It serves a good purpose in reminding the audience that you can make do with whatever you have access to, but it also raises questions about the safety of this fake construction site, if they’ve exhausted their supply of triangular bandages. Surely the Ministry of Labour would have shut the site down.

My hope, as always, is that the training remains unused and unneeded. But in the case of a freak espresso machine accident, I once again stand prepared to assist.

Author: Nick Matthews

A software developer and English major. Full time geek.

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