Star Trek Beyond: A mostly non-spoilerish review

I don’t normally get out to see movies in theatres these days, except for two cases: the film is aimed at kids, or it’s either Star Trek or Star Wars. I’m kind of predictable that way. Well, a new Star Trek movie has hit theatres, and I got a chance to see one of the 3D showings. With Fast and the Furious director Justin Lin at the helm, did this still feel like Trek? Read on to find more. The only spoilers refer to the official trailers.

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Waterloo Region Industrial Redevelopment

I’ve now worked in the high-tech industry in Waterloo Region for over fifteen years now. I’ve worked for companies that were small, and just starting out, to some of the larger tech companies in the region, as well as the world.

Waterloo region used to have a strong industrial base, but over the years, manufacturing has moved overseas. With this shift in manufacturing, some unique properties have gone into disuse.

Among the redeveloped builds that I’ve had the opportunity to work in include 72 Victoria St, which started renovations back in 2000, 151 Charles Street, also known as the Tannery, and now 51 Breithaupt St, also known as the Breithaupt Block.

Instead of the sterile drywall and ceiling tiles in other office buildings, these buildings all featured open beam and brick construction. The character and history of the building are open to view. There is something very comforting about being able to look up to see the structure of wooden beam rafters above me, or to see a wall of old brick.

A brick wall in the Breithaupt Block building in Waterloo region
A brick wall in the Breithaupt Block building in Kitchener. It’s unique. Not every “brick in the wall” is the same. They have a character that more modern buildings cover up.

It’s interesting to see how the region has grown over the past twenty years, and how the downturn in manufacturing has changed to a rise in information technology companies. Looking at the construction of the LRT in the region, it’s easy to get annoyed at the traffic problems it’s causing. Getting from one side of King Street to the other side isn’t as easy today as it was before the construction started.

There are still derelict buildings in the downtown core, and others, such as the Mayfair Hotel, which have been torn down due to structural integrity problems. Some of these buildings, such as the Rumpel Felt building (constructed in 1913, with additions in 1942, 1961, and 1968) have been vacant for nearly a decade. The Rumpel Felt building closed in 2007.

A view of the Rumpel Felt building, a brick industrial building in downtown Kitchener
The Rumpel Felt building is a now vacant industrial building in downtown Kitchener

Others, like the MacIntosh Dry Cleaners, have closed more recently, within the past year.

The Macintosh Dry Cleaners was a family run dry cleaning business operating in Kitchener since 1934 for 81 years, but has closed in 2015 due to lack of business.

The fundamental dynamics of the region have changed. While we are no longer an industrial city, we still have a strong industrial heritage. Redevelopment plans don’t need to include tearing down these older buildings. Redevelopment of existing buildings maintains a connection to the history of the region, as well as providing a creative place to work.

This has been a successful strategy as well, with the tech hub at Communitech, the University of Waterloo’s Velocity incubator, and a number of great startups like Vidyard, and D2L in the region.