Star Trek DS9 Reviews: If Wishes Were Horses

To be honest, If Wishes Were Horses really didn’t capture my imagination. Manufactured crises with deus ex machina endings just don’t cut it. Still, there are some redeeming qualities in the episode, one of which is watching Bashir try to explain to Jadzia Dax why his subconscious created a version of Dax that has the single goal of seducing him.

Dax passionately kisses Bashir while he checks his tricorder
It’s probably not a good sign when you pull out a tricorder when your crush kisses you

Wormhole aliens

This is a different twist on a First Contact story. Some wormhole aliens tap into the subconscious minds of the inhabitants of DS9, and take on forms from their imagination. Some hand wavy techno-babble is used, but the main point is to enable a story which uses the power of imagination, something which Odo refers to as a waste of time.

It’s an interesting idea, but doesn’t really get developed enough. Instead of focusing on the idea of a first contact story, this is really a disaster of the week type of story. If you can’t yet tell, I’m not usually a fan of this type of story, unless it can offer something exceptional in the way of character development. Sadly, there is nothing really new or novel in this episode. Bashir’s infatuation with Dax is already well established, and nothing really interesting occurs.

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Star Trek: DS9 Reviews: Captive Pursuit

As boring as I found Babel, it was quickly followed by one of the best early episodes of the series, Captive Pursuit. While in the last several episodes, DS9 has seen increased traffic due to the wormhole, this is the first episode in which we encounter life from the other side. First contact, the essence of diplomatic relations.

So what do we learn about life on the other side of the wormhole? The first creature from the other side is an alien who calls himself Tosk. He has some pretty advanced survival techniques, such as the ability to camouflage himself by turning invisible, only requiring 17 minutes of rest per cycle, and has nutrient sacs embedded around his body for sustenance. Tosk is extremely skittish, reacting quickly to unknown noises. He really seems like a fugitive from justice, a cornered rat, with a built-in flight or fight reflex.

Tosk on his ship
Tosk on his ship, shortly after passing through the wormhole.

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